Latest Blog Post

Read the latest article written by EPPIA members, published in the Eden Prairie News.

Residential Care Homes

Although the concept of residential care has been around the state of Minnesota since the 1990’s one often asks what residential care is and how is it different from a traditional assisted living.

Part of the confusion lies in the fact that most residential care homes are licensed as assisted living but how and where we provide our care makes all the difference in the world. Generally speaking, the homes are free-standing, single-family homes located in residential neighborhoods. Simply put, we provide high quality care in real homes in established communities. This gives individuals a place to age within their own community.

Residential care homes are licensed and monitored by the Minnesota Department of Health. Most residential care homes are privately owned and managed by a 1-2 person team dedicated to knowing you and your family. On average, homes house between 4-12 residents resulting in a low caregiver to resident ratio. This allows for more individualized care and for close bonds to form between caregivers and residents. Homes are staffed with qualified awake caregivers 24/7. Homes have access to an RN and owners of the homes are often on site. Owners serve as the point person, streamlining communication with families and providers. Activities are provided and individual routines are respected.

The small number of residents creates an intimate family-like environment. It also allows homes to specialize in types of care. Homes may specifically serve those with Alzheimer’s and dementia, Parkinson’s Disease and 50-70 year olds with other types of cognitive or physical disabilities. Other homes may have a mixed population of care needs. Whatever the case may be, residential care homes are warm and inviting, staffed by competent individuals.

Staff are competent and compassionate individuals who treat residents like their own family members. Staff receive ongoing training to allow for the best delivery of service. Families and residents find comfort in this and real bonds are developed. Staff, residents and visitors naturally become a family unit. Conversation will flow with and among all due to the nature of the intimate setting.

Transitioning from one’s home to a facility is difficult, but moving to a residential care home allows for minimal disruption because it is a one-time move. Homes adapt themselves to meet the needs of the residents and work with other service providers to enable the individual to remain within the care home. Individualized care plans are developed with the family and/or resident. Care is modified to meet the changing needs of the residents. When the time comes, hospice is called to provide support through the end of life.

Ask yourself-Would your loved one’s current housing situation:

  • Adapt the environment to meet the needs of one resident?
  • Develop a plan to help residents with behaviors rather than hospitalize or medicate them?
  • Have family sleep over at the end of life?
  • Allow resident to iron, laundry, set tables?
  • Recognize them as an individual who comes with a past that was enriching?
  • Allow a husband and wife to live together regardless of care levels?
  • Have a staff person escort them to the Emergency Room?
  • Move in with their beloved pet?
  • Modify one’s care to support end of life, thus allowing them to remain in the home?
  • Discuss with family and doctor’s about avoiding hospitalizations and being treated at the home?

In the end, we are smaller, more intimate and offer individualized care through the end of life in a real home. All of this is managed by a one or two person management team that really knows your family member and are available 24/7 to meet the needs of families and residents. Visit www.Residentialcare-mn.org to learn more.

Christine Rowland, MSW Pioneer Estates
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Jenny Morgan, RN Breck Homes
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Tina Haugstad RN Nurturing Care
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EPPIA is a networking group whose members are committed to the welfare of seniors in our community. EPPIA meets five times a year to exchange information and problem solve in the field of aging. For more information on EPPIA please visit our website at www.edenprairieaging.org.

The Senior Games Are Coming!

According to Sue Bohnsack, Recreation Supervisor at the Eden Prairie Senior Center, it’s never too late to maintain your ability and to stay in shape. Staying in shape maximizes one’s opportunities for social involvement and a high quality of life. The Eden Prairie Senior Center has lots of activities geared to individuals of varying abilities. Here are just a few of the things they offer: biking club, walking club, golf, pickleball, Zumba, yoga, tai chi, and bocce ball. They also partner with the Community Center for swimming, and physical fitness activities. So, is there an athlete in each of us, just waiting to be discovered? Yes! Just ask Sue and she will help you get started in the right direction.

Speaking of athletes, a great event is just around the corner, the Minnesota Senior Games, which will be held August 2 – 9. They’re looking for athletes to participate as well as volunteers. It’s not too late to get involved!

Registration for the Minnesota Senior Games is now open. The 2014 Minnesota Senior Games, featuring 21 medal sports for athletes over the age of 50, will be held August 2 – 9 in Bloomington, Minneapolis and Saint Paul. The state games are a qualifying event for the National Senior Games presented by Humana scheduled to take place in Minnesota in 2015.

The mission of the state and national games are to promote health and wellness to all aging Americans. Individuals and/or teams are encouraged to sign up, train and participate in a variety of sports, including: 5k race, 10k race, archery, badminton, basketball, billiards, bowling, cycling, golf, horseshoes, pickleball, racquetball, shuffleboard, softball, swimming, table tennis, tennis, track & field, and volleyball. To qualify, participants must be 50 years old as of December 31, 2014. The Minnesota State Senior Games are open to out-of-state residents. The top four athletes in each age group (these are in five year increments) for each event will qualify to participate in the National Games next year, which will be held in Minnesota. If you think you’re too old to get involved, think again. The oldest participants in the Senior Games have been over 100 years old!

The National Senior Games is the largest multi-sport event in the world for adults 50 and over with an expected 12,000 athletes competing and 30,000 guests attending. Competitions will take place July 3 – 16, 2015 at various venues throughout Bloomington, Minneapolis and Saint Paul.

July 21st is the deadline to register online for the Minnesota Senior Games that will be held this summer. If you want to be involved and don’t want to compete, volunteers are needed too! Visit mnseniorgames.com to get more information, register as an athlete, or sign up to volunteer in this summer’s Senior Games.

Submitted by EPPIA Members:
Holly Hansen, Senior Partner at www.BrilliantMovesMN.com
Sue Bohnsack, Recreation Supervisor at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

EPPIA is a networking group whose members are committed to the welfare of seniors in our community. EPPIA meets five times a year to exchange information and problem solve in the field of aging. For more information on EPPIA please visit our website at www.edenprairieaging.org.

Avoid Falls and Stay Active!

One of the biggest fears seniors have is losing their independence. This was recently confirmed by Eden Prairie seniors who took a city survey which asked seniors about services, activities, and attitudes. As we age, we cannot control everything in our lives that might affect our independence such as certain health problems or just getting old enough where we need a little help to manage our daily lives.

But we can ensure that we stay healthy and independent as long as possible by having good health habits, staying socially, mentally and physically active and avoiding falls. For an older person, a fall can easily result in a fractured hip or pelvis, and that can be an instant life changer that negatively impacts independence. We often think of falls as a risk during winter, which they are, but falls can happen in your home or outside on a summer day. There are many steps a person can take to reduce their risk of falling both at home and when out and about. Here are a few simple things you can do to reduce your risk of falling.

  • Eliminate scatter rugs.
  • Remove clutter and objects you could trip on.
  • Watch where you are walking: uneven or wet pavement can be a hazard.
  • If you spill, wipe it up promptly so you don’t slip.
  • Have a well-lit home; replace light bulbs when burned out.
  • Use a bench or chair in the shower.
  • Have grab bars in your bathroom.
  • Make sure you have sturdy railings indoors and outdoors.
  • When sitting, get up slowly and get your balance before walking.
  • Check with your doctor if you feel dizzy; some medications cause this.
  • Exercise regularly to stay strong and flexible.
  • Wear good shoes: avoid flip flops, backless slippers, or shoes that are too big or small.
  • If you need a cane or walker for balance – use it!

Taking a few simple precautions can help you stay healthy, active, and independent. If you would like to learn more about Eden Prairie seniors’ responses to the City’s survey, go to www. edenprairie.org, click on “Parks and Recreation” then “Senior Center” and you will see a news item and link to the “Baby Boomer Survey Results.”

Submitted by EPPIA Members:
Holly Hansen, Senior Partner at www.BrilliantMovesMN.com
Sue Bohnsack, Recreation Supervisor at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Rhonda Kalal, CAREGiver Director at www.homeinstead.com

EPPIA is a networking group whose members are committed to the welfare of seniors in our community. EPPIA meets five times a year to exchange information and problem solve in the field of aging. For more information on EPPIA please visit our website at www.edenprairieaging.org.

Care Options for Seniors

“When is it time to make a change?” This is different for each individual. Consider the medical, social, and financial implications of staying in place, engaging in-home services, or moving to a senior community. Determine in advance what your wants and health changes may be factors in making a decision to move or bring in services.

Choosing the best care for yourself or an aging parent can be complex and emotional. Before making decisions, ask questions and gather facts! Make a list of your current needs, future desires, and how much you are able or willing to pay. Research available resources/options and list the pros and cons when looking at services, care providers, and senior communities.

To help you get started, get a free planning worksheet at the Eden Prairie Senior Center. Other resources include the EPPIA website, www.edenprairieaging.org, and USA Today’s best seller Your Step-by-Step Guide: Stages of Senior Care by Paul and Lori Hogan, founders of Home Instead Senior Care. In assisting a loved one, it is important to listen to them and address their concerns and to include them in the process. If it becomes too difficult or overwhelming; this may be the time to have a professional step in to help. A short description of care options is listed below.

  • In-Home Care offers varying levels of care in your home, whether you live independently or in a senior community. Care is personalized and may include light housekeeping, meal preparation, personal care, medication management, etc.
  • Independent Living offers seniors the most independence when leaving home. These are large communities with apartments, kitchens, activities, and optional meal plans. Amenities may include beauty salons, exercise equipment, pools, theaters, libraries, billiards, chapels, and common areas for socializing. Many facilities also provide a range of personal care services as one’s needs change, including on-site doctor and medical visits and personal assistance.
  • Assisted Living provides 24 hour care. Meals, housekeeping and laundry are generally included. Assistance with ADL’s (Activities of Daily Living) such as bathing, dressing, and medication management is also available. Seniors still enjoy independence with private apartments and bathrooms. These communities range in size, and may be integrated with independent living.
  • Long Term Care (LTC) facilities offer skilled nursing care. These facilities provide care for people with serious and complex medical conditions and they often accept people who cannot afford to pay privately and need financial assistance. These facilities offer various levels of care.
  • Memory Care serves individuals with various forms of dementia. This care is provided in specialized, secure units in many residential communities, and LTC facilities. Meals, housekeeping, assistance with ADLs, and activities are provided. Personal care services are offered on an a la carte basis or included in the monthly fee.
  • Residential Care Homes provide services in a smaller home-like environment with higher staffing ratios than assisted living, home cooked meals, and more personalized care. Residents may have a private or shared bedroom, and the rest of the home is commonly used. Activities, in-home beauty and medical services are generally available. Some homes have 24 hour staff and provide skilled nursing, dementia care, and end-of-life care.

When considering which of the above options is most appropriate for you, it is important that you know your needs, consider possible future needs, and visit a variety of facilities. In addition to the physical attributes, it is also important to consider such things as staff knowledge, level of staffing, activities, and last but not least, food!

Submitted by EPPIA Members:
Jonathan Rosenberg, Owner of Twin Cities Care www.twincitiescare.com
Rhonda Kalal, CAREGiver Director at www.homeinstead.com

Holly Hansen, Senior Partner at www.BrilliantMovesMN.com

EPPIA is a networking group whose members are committed to the welfare of seniors in our community. EPPIA meets five times a year to exchange information and problem solve in the field of aging. For more information on EPPIA please visit our website at www.edenprairieaging.org.

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